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Because of Me?

Because of Me?

I have long been annoyed by the “cute” church signs that we see popping up at churches everywhere. Some are funny, some are cute, some are weird, and some are very, very bad theology. I was witness to one of these signs today as I was driving.

The sign read, “How many people will be in Heaven because of you?”

First, let me say I understand what they mean. BUT, this should never be asked, at least not in this way. The truth of the matter is nobody will be in Heaven because of me. Not one single person will be in Heaven because of anything that I have done. People will only be in Heaven because of Christ and what He has done.

Does God use us as tools in his salvation plan? Yes. Are we the cause of salvation? Absolutely not. It is bad and dangerous theology.

Now you may say, but it’s just a cute saying that makes you think. In one sense that is true. But when we are talking about biblical truths we should be precise. We should not look to be cute with our words but accurately present the message of the Scriptures.

Jesus said that no man comes to the Father but through him (John 14:6). Jesus is the way, Jesus is the truth, He is the life. There is nothing that we say or do that causes someone to go to Heaven. It is God and God alone through the work and person of Christ alone.

Book Review: The Teaching Ministry of the Church

Book Review: The Teaching Ministry of the Church

The Teaching Ministry of the Church, edited by William R. Yount, is a resource designed to help churches and pastors set up an educational ministry within their church. Educational ministries range from Sunday School to youth group, to adult education.

The book is written by a slew of authors in various essays. While much of the book is profitable, particularly regarding methods of Bible Study, I found much of the teaching advice and instruction to be outdated and short-sighted.

The book does not seem to grasp modern culture and educational research. Its methods look to be from the 1970s and would fail to capture audience attention in the modern culture.

In short, the book captures the right needs for education in the church. It also captures the correct roles for God, Pastors, and Laity in teaching the church. But the book fails in actually instructing how to best execute that educational role.

With all of this in mind, I do not recommend this resource.