Will Roe v. Wade Be Overturned?

Yesterday the country was in a stir over a case being heard by the Supreme Court, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health. Pro-Life conservatives see this as a legitimate chance to finally undo the damage caused by Roe v. Wade back in the ’70s.

But for Christians, this should not even be a debate. All people are made in the image of God (Gen. 1:26-27). We are unique among creation. We are the crown jewel of creation in the eyes of the Lord. That does not mean we are perfect, no, we have perverted God’s creation with sin. But there is something to be said about the sanctity of life. Psalm 139 says that God crafted us in our mother’s womb. We are fearfully and wonderfully made. That is not just something a mother gets to destroy because of convenience.

The idea that abortion is about women’s health is shameful, sinful, and wrong. Abortion is about the murder of innocent life. People can try and justify it all they want. But at the end of the day, it is murder. It is a premeditated, intentional, often violent, killing of a human being. It is the most heinous of acts. The situation does not matter. It does not matter if the mother made bad choices or if she was the victim of equally heinous circumstances, she does not have the God-given right to kill an innocent child. Period.

These truths are reality no matter what a court or a legislative body decides.

Christians are hopeful that abortion in this country is stamped out. But even if it is not outlawed legally, we must continue to call abortion what it is, murder. We must continue to support the women who feel like that is their only option by giving them alternatives. We need to be willing to support financially, to adopt, to foster, and to help in any way we can so the unborn can live their lives, a true God-given right.

Does John 3:16 Prove Jesus Died For All?

One of the most controversial subjects in all of theology is the subject of the atonement. For whom did Christ die? Did Jesus die for every person who ever lived or did He only die for those who would place their trust in Him?

One verse that those against the doctrine of limited atonement point to is John 3:16.

16 “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.

The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2016), Jn 3:16.

The argument is that because of the use of the word world we see that Christ died for every individual who ever lived.

But there is a problem with this assertion. John 3:16 does not say that Jesus died for the entire world. What does the verse actually say? It says God loved the world. But what does world mean?

The Greek word, κόσμον (kosmos) does mean world. And in the context of John 3:16 it is referring to creation. The argument can be made, legitimately, that it is also referring specifically to people of the world. I agree with this assessment. However, that still does not say that Jesus died for every individual.

The next part of the verse says that God gave His only Son. God loved the world and, as a result, He gave his Son up. But for what purpose did He give Christ? It was not to pay for the sins of every individual. At the end of the day, if you argue for Christ dying for all individuals that is your logical conclusion, that He paid for the sins of everyone. No, it says that whoever believes.

Now, I will say that I do not believe that this verse actually deals with the question people try to make it answer. I do not believe it deals with who Christ died for. But we know from other passages, which will not be dealt with in this article, that He laid His life down for the sheep (John 10:15). The only thing John 3:16 tells us is that Christ, at minimum, died for those who would believe in Him.

Breaking Free: 2021

It has been a while since I have written about the United Methodist Church, life has been crazy. But in June of this year our church finally broke free from the church. This was a long time coming as the UMC has lost hold of biblical truths and have decided to follow the world.

The church is going strong. We have a solid statement of faith and a great group of members who love the Lord and love biblical truth. It was not an easy process but one that we decided to go through as we took a stand for truth. God has blessed our efforts!

Book Review: Sanctification

In Sanctification, Pastor John MacArthur reminds pastors of the need to care for the sanctification of those who are under their care. Sanctification, he argues, is an area that is often forgotten in the American church today. He focuses on the calling of pastors to be actual shepherds of their local flocks.

But MacArthur does not only focus on pastors. He calls on individual believers to also work on their sanctification stating that we should be striving to be more Christlike each day.

After making the initial case for sanctification, MacArthur spends the rest of the book discussing what true sanctification looks like in the life of the believer. First, sanctification looks like Christ. Christ was the ultimate embodiment of sanctification as shown in chapter four of the book titled, “Christ, the Embodiment of True Sanctification.”

But MacArthur does not hold punches either. He attacks the thought of many churches and Christians today that we are saved, following Jesus and that is it. He attacks the idea that we don’t really need to pursue total sanctification or that we cannot attain it (noting of course that total sanctification does not happen on this side of Heaven). He attacks the lawlessness of many new Christian movements and attacks the seeker-sensitive ideals that court the ways of the world just to put bodies in the pews. MacArthur makes a plea for the church today to return to a true biblical worldview.

The book finishes by taking a look at what grace really is and what grace really entails. It’s not just a “get out of Hell free card.” Grace means we get a chance to live our lives holy and acceptable and pleasing to God. It is a chance to strive to be like Christ. It is a chance to live set apart from the world.

Overall, Sanctification is a quick an easy read and a refreshing call to the church and believer’s today to live better lives for their king. I give the book four out of five stars.

I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair review.

Be Anxious For Nothing

In the past week we have heard many reports about the instability in the Middle East, particularly in Iraq and Iran. We hear about wars and rumors of wars. We hear about the politics. We hear about imminent attacks. The 24/7 news cycle puts us in a state of fear, anxiousness and worry.

But in these troubled times we need to remind ourselves what Paul said to the Philippian church. Be anxious for nothing (Phil. 4:6-7).

So what are we to do? The answer is simple. Pray. We are to pray and read the Word of God. We are to rest in His arms knowing that He is the one who makes the decisions. He decides our futures. He decides what will or will not happen to us. Our lives do not rest in the arms (or weapons) of men but of God.

What did Jesus say?

Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life? And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

“Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.

Matthew 6:26–34 (ESV)

We do not need to worry about what tomorrow will bring. Tomorrow will take care of itself. All we need to concern ourselves with is that we are right with God and that we are spreading His Gospel to a weary land.

The Word Became Flesh: John 1:1-18

The Gospel of John

Starting a new series on Sunday Nights on the Gospel of John, David Taylor preaches on the Word became flesh.

The Gospel of John shows the majesty of the deity of Christ. This is found no better than in the opening prologue of the Gospel. Jesus is the Word, the Word is God. That Word, Jesus, is the Light of the world. However, the Word was rejected by most unless they were granted to Him by the Father.

David goes verse by verse through this glorious section of Scripture to bring out the truths of who Christ is, and what our relation is to Him.

The Separation Protocol: What I Told the Church I Serve

People Need Jesus

by Chris Ritter

I thought I would share what I wrote to the congregation I am appointed to serve this past Friday night amidst the news of the separation protocol.

Dear Church Family,

Grace and peace to you in the strong name of Jesus.

Our denomination is certainly in the news today. Here are examples:
Christianity Today Magazine Coverage
Wall Street Journal Coverage
New York Times Coverage
Washington Post Coverage
Quad Cities Dispatch and Chicago Tribune Coverage with quote from me.

I thought it might be helpful to offer some information, clarification, and context about what is happening and what it might mean for us.

A plan for the separation of The United Methodist Church was announced today through the Council of Bishops website. The proposal was the result of months of negotiation with key bishops and leaders of caucus groups. The process was aided by Kenneth Feinberg, a…

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Thoughts on the Protocol of Reconciliation and Grace Through Separation

By now most people have heard about the proposal coming from leaders in the United Methodist Church regarding the separation of the denomination over issues of homosexuality. It is being called the Protocol of Reconciliation and Grace Through Separation. It is being heralded as a great compromise for an impossible situation. But I wanted to give a few thoughts on it.

First, why is it that those who are staying true to the teaching of Scripture and the United Methodist Church, which still holds homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching, are the ones who are being forced out? Why should those who do not want to follow Scripture and defy the church the ones that get to keep the church? I’ve read articles about this very thing and none of them hold any logic that falls within the realm of reality.

Second, why are we earmarking so much money for social justice issues in this proposal? I have a real problem with the idea of reparations and that is exactly what this proposal includes, to the tune of $39 million dollars. This money is to support communities “historically marginalized by racism.”

Third, for churches who just want out of anything to do with United Methodist this plan is a non-starter. Yes there is a traditionalist denomination that would be started. But for those who have issues other than just human sexuality with the church this does not help us. If we wanted to join a different denomination, or just be independent altogether, we must go through the same exit plan that there is now and must obtain the approval of our annual conference. This, as every other plan, leaves the local church virtually powerless.

On the other hand, the plan is not finalized. It will be debated, discussed, and amended. So there is hope that the plan can be improved to help “the little church” that just wants a clear-cut exit. Only time will tell.